A history of mdma or ecstasy

Ecstasy is a popular drug with ravers and party goers thanks to its euphoric and stimulatory effects.

A history of mdma or ecstasy

Others call it Molly, X, or rolls. Regardless of its street name, MDMA has been a popular drug of abuse for the past 4 to 5 decades. A German chemist first synthesized the drug in the early part of the 20th century.

But it had limited potential as a pharmaceutical agent. Eventually, it became a street drug that was popular in the rave scene in the 80s and 90s. MDMA, or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, is a psychoactive stimulant that increases the release of 2 key neurotransmitters within the brain—dopamine and serotonin.

However, MDMA can also cause nausea, chills, sweating, rapid heart rate, increased body temperature, jaw clenching, and dry mouth. Because the drug artificially spurs the release of serotonin, when it wears off, the user is left with a relative depletion of serotonin in the brain, which may be associated with temporary depression and irritability.

MDMA has become widely known as ecstasy (shortened "E", "X", or "XTC"), usually referring to its tablet form, although this term may also include the presence of possible adulterants or dilutants. The UK term "mandy" and the US term "molly" colloquially refer to MDMA in a crystalline powder form that is thought to be free of adulterants. Ecstasy is a popular drug with ravers and party goers thanks to its euphoric and stimulatory effects. It helps people dance the night away and doesn’t lead to severe hangovers, unlike alcohol. Like most drugs though, it can have deleterious effects. With the use of MDMA spreading, psychotherapists tried to keep it relatively quiet, but the DEA eventually cottoned onto the drug. It started being found in more and more raids, and people were reporting contamination of the drugs. Something had to give, and in , the DEA used a recently imposed law to ban ecstasy.

The long-term effects of MDMA are not well known. The tablets are rarely pure and are often cut with other drugs such as heroinketaminePCP, DXM, ephedrine, caffeine, and mescaline.

He was trying to develop a vasoconstrictor to stop bleeding and accidentally discovered MDMA instead, which was then referred to as methylsafrylamine.

Does MDMA Have Therapeutic Value?

Inthe company patented it for potential pharmaceutical use, but it was never taken further since no legitimate medical use was identified at the time. However, none of these experiments moved past animal test subjects, and they have since been declassified. He conducted one study alongside Dr.

A history of mdma or ecstasy

Shulgin felt the drug could be valuable in therapy and shared it with his psychotherapist friend, Leo Zeff, in Zeff was impressed with his experience and introduced it to other therapists, who in turn spread it further. By the s, more than 1, therapists were using the drug as a therapeutic aid.

They attempted to control the spread of information on the drug, hoping they could get enough informal research completed before it became public. They were successful at keeping the drug on a low profile from tobut it eventually became a popular drug of abuse and the U.

A distributor in Los Angeles coined the name Ecstasy in as a marketing tactic. Then, inseveral Texas chemists began distributing the drug.

A history of mdma or ecstasy

They sold it in Texas and New York at bars, nightclubs, and convenience stores. People could also purchase it by credit card through a toll-free number. As a result, a group of psychotherapists, physicians, lawyers, and researchers requested a hearing to determine whether or not it should be scheduled.

The initial hearing was held on February 1,and it was determined that 3 more hearings would take place before a determination was made. The researchers found that MDMA helped individuals in therapy better express their feelings, retrieve lost traumatic memories, and relieve emotional symptoms caused by those memories.When Ecstasy boomed in popularity in the early s, it tended to consist of pure MDMA, or sometimes its chemical sister MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine).

But after MDMA became illegal in the. Ecstasy is a popular drug with ravers and party goers thanks to its euphoric and stimulatory effects. It helps people dance the night away and doesn’t lead to severe hangovers, unlike alcohol. Like most drugs though, it can have deleterious effects. MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine), most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy (often abbreviated E, X, or XTC), is a semisynthetic member of the amphetamine classof psychoactive drugs, a subclass of the phenethylamines.

With the use of MDMA spreading, psychotherapists tried to keep it relatively quiet, but the DEA eventually cottoned onto the drug. It started being found in more and more raids, and people were reporting contamination of the drugs. Something had to give, and in , the DEA used a recently imposed law to ban ecstasy.

History Early research and use. In a federal court hearing the American Civil Liberties Union successfully argued that the sentencing guideline for MDMA/ecstasy is based on outdated science, leading to excessive prison sentences. Other courts have upheld the sentencing guidelines.

The United States District Court for the. The Invention of MDMA - Ecstasy The Invention and History of MDMA. Share Flipboard Email Print Pressed pills or "pressies" of MDMA.

What is the history of MDMA? | National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

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History Of Ecstasy